Knowing Touch for Health™

What is Touch for Health™?

Touch for Health™ is the most widely used system of kinesiology in the world. Millions of people have experienced and benefited from TFH. It is recognised and respected as a fundamental training for other kinesiology systems as well as a healing modality in it’s own right – and a key source for the emergence of Energy Medicine, Brain Gym, Energy Kinesiology, and even Energy Psychology.

Touch for Health (TFH) is a system of natural health care which combines muscle monitoring with the principles of Chinese medicine to assess energy and body function. With simple, gentle yet powerful techniques, it creates balance within the meridian system of the body, on all levels. Touch For Health addresses the Structural, Nutritional and Emotional stresses common in our everyday life.

In TFH we use muscle testing as a method of biofeedback to identify imbalances in the body’s energy system. Using a holistic approach we rebalance the body’s energies and activate the body’s intrinsic healing process so that the body can better heal itself.

 

Touch for Health ™ is highly recommended for Medical doctors, Nurses, Physiotherapists, Chiropractors, Sports therapists, Sport coaches, Physical therapists, Occupational therapists, and anyone who is concerned with personal health, growth and development.

 

The TFH process can also assist individuals to better achieve their life goals with goal specific balancing.

Of the people with specific symptoms, the ones who benefit most from Touch for Health™ methods are those who have been to a professional and have been told that there doesn’t seem to be any organic cause for the suffering. The professional recognizes that the patient has a genuine complaint, but is unable to pinpoint a specific cause. Touch for Health’s energy balancing begins by setting a goal. What outcome is desired? What performance does the client want enhanced? Next comes testing of the muscles related to each of the meridians. Then acupressure is used to stimulate the flow of energy and the indicator muscles are retested for positive responses. This simple technique often gives dramatic improvement.
– John F. Thie, Founder of Touch for Health

TFH Kinesiology can be easily learned by anyone, with a little practice, without any prior knowledge of muscles, physiology, meridians, etc. The practical, hands-on Touch for Health Synthesis workshops are facilitated by Certified Touch for Health Instructors, trained by the Faculty of the International Kinesiology College (IKC), and active in over 60 countries worldwide.

History of TFH Balancing: 1973 and Beyond

We see an unprecedented need for change in the way that we live and care for ourselves, and an unprecedented opportunity for those of us in TFH/K to take a leadership role in fulfilling human needs and effecting change in our lives. Now that people from all walks of life –business, arts, science, religion, etc.– and among all the healing disciplines– medicine, chiropractic, faith healing, massage, psychology, etc.– we are uniquely positioned to contribute in all of these areas. We are uniquely prepared to fulfil the desperately needed role of interface between the health-care practitioner (whether reductionist, disease centred, or holistic, wellness oriented), and personal responsibility, self awareness, and self-care.

TFH draws not only on over 30 years of development and integration of techniques in Kinesiology, but thousands of years of philosophies and sciences of living well, proven by what we feel is the truest and best means: direct and personal, subjective experience of a better life. Our concepts of Wellness integrate the holistic worldview of the East, as well as the vitalistic tradition in the West as espoused in the original concepts of naturopathy, chiropractic, and even Western scientific medicine.

Currently we find ourselves at a crossroads. Much of the change and growth, branching out and diverging of paths has come full circle to where all of the Kinesiologies, with their varied areas of emphasis, multiple techniques, concepts, and models, recognize a commonality of core values, beliefs, and shared purpose that allow us to call this vast array of people, ideas, programs, schools associations and institutions all part of one body, the Touch for Health Synthesis. And it is through this element of unity that we can take a cooperative approach to our efforts, with mutual regard and respect, health and forthright discussion and exchange of ideas and common purpose and vision for the future.

Touch for Health was created by John F. Thie, DC (1933-2005). The first Manual was published in 1973 and launched a worldwide movement in a holistic approach to health which teaches the restoring of our natural energies. It is a practical guide to natural health using acupressure, touch and massage to improve postural balance and reduce physical and mental pain and tension. It is the key source for the emergence of Energy Medicine, Brain Gym, Energy Kinesiology, and even Energy Psychology.

For more details on TFH and where to learn it, visit Breakthru Academy here.

 

Educational Kinesiology Symposium 2014 (28 March) 肌动学与特殊孩童学能发展研讨会

A Focus on Developmental Strategies for People With Special Needs.

Breakthru Enrichment Station organized the first Educational Kinesiology Symposium in Malaysia, with the objective of bringing awareness of various educational strategies, methods, tools and testimonies in assisting special needs people/children’s development and growth.

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This is a one day event, and there were a total of 12 speakers from local and overseas presented their efforts and knowledge in this event. We would like to show our greatest appreciation to these speakers, MC and translators in supporting this event (yup it’s an English/Mandarin event)!

Registration begins at 8.00am, thank you everyone for arriving early. Elaine and her team did a great job in registering and giving away welcome notes to participants.

 

Some of the book that are on sale. If you wish to buy them, please email us for a book list.

 

The children from Breakthru Enrichment Station volunteered to perform a lively dance to welcome our guest. Some of these children have special needs but they all enjoy the performance. The dance that they presented was “Mocha – by the Minions of Despicable Me 2”.

 

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Our MC for the day, Ms Prema (in English) and Ms Liew (in Mandarin). This is a bi-lingual event.

 

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In our welcoming speech, Ms Phoebe (right), and her translator Ms Wan Ching. She highlighted the importance of Active Parenting in supporting their special needs children’s development and what Educational Kinesiology can help them to be more pro-active in such role.

 

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Our key-note speaker, Ms Moira Dempsey (right), is from Australia, and her translator Ms Phoebe (in Mandarin). It was an important lesson to learn about challenges a child face in his/her development.

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Our special adress speaker Ms Ngiam Lian Ai (right), and her translator (in Mandarin). She stressed in the importance of putting the right focus on skill appropriate training (including fine-motor development through edu-kinesiology and movement based learning) instead of over emphasis on academic development, and shared some of her success stories. The refreshments for this event are all prepared by the special needs children trained from Breakthru Enrichment Station.

 

Ms Prema introduces Rhythmic Movement Training (RMT) and their various movements to integrate the many reflexes we had in our body.

 

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Mr Victor Wong of Hong Kong explains about ADHD and how he deal with his clients with such challenge.

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Ms Candy of Hong Kong (lady holding the batik souvenir, presented by Cassandra in red) shows us how to do Double Doodle (an Edu-K Movement) with music. Children and adults enjoyed doing their double doodle activities, and were most impressed with the fun it brings too!

 

Mr Dennis Ho (right) and his team (Mr Dennis & Ms Candy) did a great job demonstrating the Meridian Dance, and everyone just loves doing the dance! It is an easy and fun way to remember the primary meridian movements used in Touch for Health™. Lets have the music!

 

Ms Cynthia Teo of Singapore (right) shared the usefulness of Essential Oils in helping ourselves and our children. These clinical grade essential oils are greatly effective and we use it widely in our centre to help our children (and trainers too!). Email us (bestcentre@breakthru.com.my) for your purchasing needs, or to learn more about these oils you may visit Young Living website.

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Lunch is served!

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Ms Siew Lee explains about how do we observe our brain waves using tools from NeuroSky® for the purpose of knowing and training our state of mind. The headset scans your brain wave and can show, in terms of your ability to focus or calm down, the difference before and after doing your Brain Gym® balances, especially useful when you work on your focus or centering dimension balances. Email us (bestcentre@breakthru.com.my) if you wish to know more.

 

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Ms Marie Helene shared her experience with bringing up her teenage child that has special challenges. Many great advise was shared, and also how she uses Edu-K in the process. A very valuable session for many parents, as Marie is a very experienced and knowledgeable trainer cum mother.

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Mr Chong and Ms Sook Fern hosted the young kids parent group discussion session and shared their experience in bringing up their own special need children. Many touching stories were shared, and the importance of personal involvement (and sacrifices) in parenting cannot be stressed any lesser. But we are glad there are more methods to help us nowadays. Its up to the parents now to pick them up!

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Ms Claire Ang talks about learning can be fun using Educational Kinesiology! She gain her first hand insight of this topic from her profession as an Educational Psychologist, and very much encourage everyone to try so. Her PowerPoint presentation will be uploaded here soon.

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Many thanks to all speakers and those who participated in the forum. Our forum moderator, Mr Moses Wong, led us through a one hour of Q&A and highlighted some key questions to discuss about.

Thank You and we appreciate all your feedbacks. See You Again Next Year!

Not forgetting those who worked hard in making this event a successful one, these are some of their photos, and the organizer truly appreciates their contribution and invites all participants together to say thank you to these workers!

Primitive Reflexes – does your child have them?

25-april-2013

What is a “reflex”?

Most of us are familiar with and have experienced a simple reflex – touch something hot or sharp with your finger: what happens? – you very quickly pull your hand away from the heat or pain, without thinking about it! This is a reflex action. It is an involuntary reaction in response to a stimulus. This simple reflex action is controlled by areas of the spinal cord. It can occur at all times throughout our life.

There are different types of reflexes in which some but not all are controlled. From conception the nervous system develops in the form of primitive reflexes. The nervous system continues to develop and the babies neurological function and ability to survive on its own comes into play. Particular primitive reflexes aid in the birth process and then as the development of the nervous system continues further the postural reflexes then begin.

Primitive Reflexes are:

  • Survival reflexes occurring sequentially in the first few weeks of foetal development
  • Automatic, stereotyped movements (e.g. blinking and breathing) directed by a very primitive part of the brain (brain stem).
  • Ideally short lived and as each fulfils its specialised function is replaced by more sophisticated structures, postural reflexes, which are controlled by the brain cortex.
  • If the functions of these are not fulfilled they are “retained” and are considered evident of an immaturity within the Central Nervous System (CNS).
Primitive reflexes are reflex actions originating in the central nervous system that are exhibited by normal infants, but not neurologically intact adults, in response to particular stimuli. These reflexes disappear or are inhibited by the frontal lobes as a child moves through normal child development.[1] These primitive reflexes are also called infantile, infant or newborn reflexes.

Older children and adults with atypical neurology (e.g., people with cerebral palsy) may retain these reflexes and primitive reflexes may reappear in adults. Reappearance may be attributed to certain neurological conditions including, but not limited to, dementia (especially in a rare set of diseases called frontotemporal degenerations), traumatic lesions, and strokes.[2][3] An individual with cerebral palsy and typical intelligence can learn to suppress these reflexes, but the reflex might resurface under certain conditions (i.e., during extreme startle reaction). Reflexes may also be limited to those areas affected by the atypical neurology, (i.e., individuals with cerebral palsy that only affects their legs retaining the Babinski reflex but having normal speech); for those individuals with hemiplegia, the reflex may be seen in the foot on the affected side only.

Primitive reflexes are primarily tested with suspected brain injury for the purpose of assessing frontal lobe functioning. If they are not being suppressed properly they are called frontal release signs. Atypical primitive reflexes are also being researched as potential early warning signs of autistic spectrum disorders.[4]

Adaptive value of reflexes

Reflexes vary in utility. Some reflexes hold a survival value, (i.e., the rooting reflex, which helps a breastfed infant find the mother’s nipple). Babies display the rooting reflex only when they are hungry and touched by another person, not when they touch themselves. There are a few reflexes that likely assisted in the survival of babies during human evolutionary past (i.e., the Moro reflex). Other reflexes such as sucking and grabbing help establish gratifying interaction between parents and infants. They can encourage a parent to respond with love and affection, and to feed their child more competently. In addition, it helps parents to comfort their infant while allowing the baby to control distress and the amount of stimulation they receive.[5]

Important types of developmental reflexes are:

Fear Paralysis Reflex (FPR)


This reflex begins to function very early after conception and should normally be integrated before birth. It can be seen in utero as movements of the head, neck and body in response to a threat. It is sometimes classified as a Withdrawal reflex rather than a primitive reflex.

Retention of this reflex presents as:

  • Fear and/or Anxiety
  • Hypersensitivity
  • Insecurity and not wanting to try new things
  • Low tolerance to stressful situations
  • Clinginess
  • Temper tantrums

Moro Reflex


moro_reflexThe moro reflex begins to function 9-12 weeks after conception and is normally fully developed at birth. It is the baby’s alarm reflex. The newborn’s higher centres are not sufficiently developed to make a rational decision whether a circumstance is threatened or not. The reflex is elicited by excessive information in any of the baby’s senses, a loud noise, bright light, sudden rough touch etc. turns on the reflex and because this reflex is a “one reflex for all occasions” the fight and flight hormonal and neurological response turns on, preparing the body for whatever turned on its alarm system.

If the moro reflex is evident after the age of 6 months then possible reactions include

  • Uncontrolled over reaction to stimulus including noise and sensory stimulus
  • Hyperactive behaviour and poor impulse control
  • Immaturity and inability to socialise
  • Inability to concentrate on a concept and finds peripheral stimulus too much
  • Adrenal fatigue due to a constant increase in adrenalin
  • Agitation and aggressive behaviour particularly in adults.

Juvenile Suck Thrust


juvenile_suckTogether with the Rooting reflex explained below this aids in the neonate to breast feed without any problems. If this reflex is not adequately integrated, the tongue projects forwards before moving backward in the normal swallow. Thus pushing the front teeth forward, altering the shape of the upper jaw causing a “overbite” and hence dental problems can develop later on.

 

Rooting Reflex


Light stroking of the cheek or stimulus of the edge of the mouth causes a baby to turn its head towards the stimulus, and open its mouth with extended tongue in preparation for suckling.

Retention symptoms include

  • Fussy eating and possibly difficulty swallowing
  • Thumb sucking
  • Speech and articulation problems
  • Constant dribbling
  • Hormonal imbalances
  • Poor manual dexterity due to the Babkin response.

Palmomental (PMR) & Plantomental Reflexes


The palmomental reflex is a reflex contraction of the eye in response to stimulus of the hand. This is also known as the “Babkin response”. This reflex emerges at 9 weeks in utero and is normally integrated by 3 months of age.

If the PMR is evident after 3 months of age it may present as

  • Children may have a habit of biting
  • Difficulty using a knife and fork
  • Difficulty moving facial muscles
  • Tension in the jaw when driving or concentrating
  • Movement of the tongue and jaw in response to a stimulus with the hand

A noticeable change when this reflex has integrated is freedom of speech, hand articulation and facial mobility.

The Plantomental reflex is related to the stepping reflex and aids in crawling and the feet.

Palmar Reflex


palmární reflexTogether with the plantar reflex this reflex develops in utero. The common evidence of this reflex being present is “grasping“. In early stages of neonatal development this reflex is also related to feeding (Babkin response). This reflex is elicited by suckling and kneading in time with the suckling response.

Retention symptoms past 3 months of age include:

  • Poor handwriting with a noticeable difficulty getting things out on paper
  • Poor fine motor skills and manual dexterity
  • Verbal articulation problems
  • General postural problems that cause a slump when sitting
  • Possibly jumbles up letters as they write them down on paper

Plantar Reflex


plantar_reflexThe Plantar reflex like the Palmer is used for grasp and emerges in utero and is normal to be fully present at birth. It is normally integrated by 6 months of age. At this age crawling and general movement of the infant is beginning and it appears that this reflex may have connection with many of the gross motor function of an infant.

If the plantar reflex is retained:

  • Balance and walking is effected
  • Running awkwardly
  • Difficulty learning to walk
  • May have problems with sports that involve co-ordination and balance
  • Adults may find that there is a chronic lower back ache on walking and standing for long periods of time
  • Recurrent ankle twisting

Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (ATNR)


This reflex begins about 18 weeks after conception and should be present at birth. This reflex appears to assist the babies movement and participation in the birthing process.

After birth the reflex continues and plays an important part in the development of hand eye coordination, object and distance perception. By the middle of the first year of life this is normally accomplished and the ATNR, being no longer required, should be integrated.

In early months, after hand-eye co-ordination is established, the ATNR locks vision on to anything which catches the attention. If the ATNR is retained beyond 6 months of age the following can be possible;

  • Hand-eye co-ordination (this can be both related to movement with hand and eye in sport as well as handwriting concerns)
  • Inability to cross over the midline of the body
  • Problems with written performance and the child will find oral performances much easier
  • Visual tracking problems
  • Ambidexterity (inability to determine a dominant hand past the correct age)
  • Proprioception and inability to judge distances.
  • Adults can also have chronic shoulder problems and/or neck problems

Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex (TLR)


tlr_reflexThe TLR begins about 12 weeks after conception. It involves the balance and position in space and is present at birth when the neck bends forward, backwards or tilts to one side. When this occurs with this reflex present the arms bend or extend depending on the position of the head. Each part of this reflex integrates at different times of the babies development and should be completed by the age of 3 years.

Retention of this reflex may cause

  • Postural problems (predominantly tight or weak muscles globally)
  • Prevents the Head Righting Reflex from developing
  • Tendency for children to walk on their toes
  • Fatigue while writing or sitting to study at a desk (due to the Head Righting Reflex not developing)
  • Difficulty judging distance, speed, depth and space
  • Motion sickness
  • This reflex concentrates on the child’s balance system and has also been associated with auditory processing disorder

Lateral Labyrinthine Reflex


Commonly found in adults. Correction of this reflex is important for those receiving Sound Therapy. It reduces the occurrence of adverse reaction to sound therapy and may assist in its effectiveness. Lateral neck flexion is often greater immediately after correction. The patient may be a little disoriented for a short while after correction and it may take a few minutes to adjust.

Sagittal Labyrinthine Reflex (SLR)


The SLR is known to assist concentration and poor posture whilst sitting. This reflex is generally related to the TLR and STNR reflexes and is important in integration of these reflexes.

Tiredness at the end of the school day, poor concentration or retention of information in class is often associated with this reflex failing to integrate. This reflex is demonstrated when the child prefers to push their chair out too far, lean onto the desk, and props their head up on their hand to ensure their head is in line with their torso. Alternatively they may slump or prefer to do their homework lying on their stomach.

Spinal Galant Reflex (SGR)


The Spinal Galant Reflex begins about 18 weeks after conception and is normally integrated before the end of the first year of life. It appears to take an active role in the birth process, causing small movements of the hip on one side, similar to the head and shoulder movements of the ATNR.

Common retention symptoms include;

  • Children who have ‘ants in their pants
  • Attention and concentration
  • Bladder problems (predominantly bedwetting)
  • Postural problems which may lead to scoliosis due to the muscular contraction on one side of the spine

Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (STNR)


The STNR is not present before or at birth and begins initially with bending of the spine at 6-9 months of life and then at 9-11 months in spinal extension. It should be integrated at 12 months of age and aids in the child’s ability to place itself in a position ready for locomotion.

Without the STNR integrating problems may include;

  • Poor posture due to the small muscles in the back being weak
  • Slouched posture.
  • Poor hand-eye co-ordination
  • Poor sensory integration
  • Poor organisational and planning skills
  • Inadequate integration of the ATNR leading to unusual movement patterns (crawling, walking and running)
  • Visual difficulties such as fast tracking movements from one object to anther

Retention of this reflex affects gross motor skills. Children are more injury prone, clumsy, and may find it difficult to coordinate their upper and lower body together. Exercise may not be enjoyed but once corrected, we commonly see an eagerness to exercise and an improved performance running and swimming.

What is “Integration”?

Primitive reflexes are hard wired into our system and remain active our whole life. During our first year of life, as our nervous system matures we begin to think using our higher mind. Thinking allows us options to move a different way to the autonomic responses hardwired in our nervous system. In order for our new intentions to be carried out unimpeded, the cortex must have developed adequately to inhibit, or override, the active primitive reflex. If maturation of the cortex is hindered in any way, its suppressive function can fail to prevent the expression of the primitive programmed response to the stimulant. Symptomatic disruptions to learning and development occur when a person’s intended actions are constantly interrupted by a more primitive programmed action.

Primitive reflexes are stimulus-elicited, automatic, without cortical involvement. If their neonatal display is not integrated into higher function, the child has little or no control over their elicitation. There is little use trying to force extra teaching or behaviour modification upon a system in which the basic intrinsic modules for learning and behaviour are not correctly functioning.

How do we (BESTCentre) help our children with these reflexes?

The process involve light muscle testing and gentle pressure on particular points and various rhythmic movements to allow each reflex to integrate. These techniques are called Rhythmic Movement Training (RMT), and at BESTCentre, our experienced practitioners guides our children with specific sequence of movements which follows the developmental pathways that have been inhibited. As our children spend adequate time with us at the centre, we are able to work on them at specific intervals and allow the reflexes to properly integrate over time. Some of the reflexes integrate within weeks, whereas others take longer.

Why are Neonatal Reflexes retained in some babies and not others?

As previously mentioned reflexes are usually inhibited by the normal movements a baby makes in the early stages of development. If the baby does not make these normal movements, the neonatal reflexes will remain active and the postural reflexes may not develop normally and hence other aspects of neuro-development that is important for learning will therefore be delayed.

Reasons for retained neonatal reflexes may include: a genetic reason, in utero constraint, decreased normal movement during the early stages of life and chemical toxicity within the baby. This chemical toxicity may include metal toxicity, environmental toxicity or the bodies inability to breakdown foods ingested.

What have these reflexes to do with my child’s readiness for school?

We suggest you to addend this 2-day course that introduces Rhythmic Movements and primitive reflex integration in a knowledgeable, fun, interactive and playful way with an emphasis on recognizing retained reflexes in young children.

Topics included in this course:

  • Role of movement in brain development, sensory processing, emotions, memory, and behavior;
  • Introduction to reflexes, stress and movement quality;
  • Neck reflexes: Tonic Labyrinthine, Asymmetrical Tonic and Symmetrical Tonic;
  • Spinal Galant reflex and attention;
  • Foot and hand reflexes;
  • Emotions, stability and role of Moro reflex and Fear Paralysis response;
  • Games and activities to integrate reflexes;
  • Includes illustrated manual.

Head here to sign-up and learn more now: http://breakthru.com.my/best/registration/?ee=124

Part of text extracts from Norwest Wellness and Wikipedia.

 

Educational Kinesiology Symposium 2014 for Special Needs

28 March 2014, 9-5pm.

由言语治疗师, 物理治疗师, 药剂师, 儿童心理学家,有特殊孩子的家长,韵律动学导师,  触动学导师, 健脑操导师及顾问来研讨 如何有效的帮助特殊需求人士及孩童们的身心发展。(现场华语翻译)

Speakers from Australia, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia came together for a focused discussion from the perspectives of Speech Therapist Occupational Therapist, Pharmacist, Child Psychologist, Parents who have special needs adults, Rhythmic Movement Training International Instructor & Provider, Touch for Health® Instructor, Brain Gym® Instructor & Consultant on how to effectively support the development of people and children with special needs.

This Event has ended. You may view the event’s photos here.

 

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This Event has ended. You may view the event’s photos here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Parents Coaching Program 2014

There were a few things happening during the holidays. Most of our teachers and facilitators underwent a series of training with renowned trainer, Cecilia Koester, USA, Author of ‘I am the child’ and ‘Movement Based Learning for children with all abilities’ and Founder of Movement Based Learning Inc. www.movementbasedlearning.com. We had up close and personal learning sessions with her witnessing the parental coaching process to identify the children’s specific needs in their learning dimensions.

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We hope to share this precious learning experience with you, spouse and care giver of your child so that we may partner together to see a smoother breakthru and progress for your child’s current challenges in 2013.

This is a customized programme for parents who have special needs. These 8 evening sessions will explore the P.L.A.Y. Strategies in nurturing and supporting the development of the children.

Parents will learn and experience:

  • the necessary natural process of Primitive Reflex Integration in your child
  • appropriate movement based learning that acts as spring board for your child’s development
  • developing an conducive learning environment for your child to breakthrough with his/her current challenges
  • home support that allow you to gauge your child’s development
  • Questions and Answers session
  • Opportunity to network with other parents.

The (2014) dates for this batch of parents coaching program are each Wednesday, from 7pm-9pm:

  • January 8 and 15
  • February 19, 26
  • March 5, 12, 19
  • April 2

Language : Mandarin and English

The coaching programme includes 8 essential topics and building blocks activities that addresses the foundational pieces of learning so that children who have special needs can learn how to learn. Parents are coached to support their children in a functional, practical way so that any information is directly applicable and useable.

Non-BESTCentre parents can also sign-up for this course here at: http://breakthru.com.my/best/registration/?ee=129

What is Movement Based Learning

The movements and activities that Movement Based Learning, Inc. incorporate in the child’s learning are based on natural, normal human development. They bring about rapid and often dramatic improvements in focus, comprehension, communication, organization and physical movement. The Brain Gym® International Foundation developed a unique program of physical activities that synchronizes body and mind to enhance learning and achievement for people of all ages and abilities. The activities and methods of Brain Gym® are safe, easy and enjoyable. Cecilia Koester developed a course for Brain Gym® International called Brain Gym® for Special Needs Providers. Therapists, teachers, tutors, elder caregivers and parents as well as anyone in the caring professions will benefit from learning how to assess the needs of an individual, develop a Brain Gym® program to meet those needs, evaluate the effectiveness of the program with ways to modify when necessary for best results.

Brain Gym® for Special Needs Providers offers excellent applications for a variety of mental and physical challenges including: autism, cerebral palsy, attention deficit disorders (ADD and ADHD), dyslexia, Angelman’s Syndrome, Down Syndrome, speech impairments, brain injuries, blindness, deafness and impairments caused by strokes.

Participants will leave this course with the new skills that optimize learning and performance in all areas of life. And they will find that these tools are immediately applicable in home, school and therapeutic settings! In addition to teaching the above courses, Cecilia Koester is mentoring others to teach Brain Gym® for Special Education Providers.

To gain more knowledge about MBL follow this link.

(source taken from Movement Based Learning website at www.movementbasedlearning.com)

 

合情理人際關係工作坊 (REBT) Workshop – 10 June 2014


武自珍教授:合情理人際關係工作坊

6月102014早上9点半至傍晚4点半

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內容介紹

武自珍教授由紐約亞伯艾理斯訓練學院學成並取得證書後,一直從事臨床心理諮詢實務工作。先後在台灣兩大諮詢機構張老師及生命線持續推出理情行為治療法的訓練課程,並於各地醫院、心理衛生單位及社會福利單位進行在職訓練。經過數十年經驗將中國的思想方式融入理性情緒行為心理治療法中使理性情緒行為治療法成為更貼近中國文化的心理諮詢方法。至今已有超過千人接受過自珍情理心理諮詢法的訓練,也改善許多人的家庭氣氛及人際關係。

美國家庭服務協會(Family Service of America)對家庭的定義是「家庭是提供它的成員間情緒、身體及經濟的互相扶持。理想上,這種家庭的特質是它的成員間有著親密、深度、連續及許諾的關係」。因此家庭不僅是人與人的的組合,同時是提供情緒的支持與安全感的場所。健康的家庭有至少六個特質:默契與許諾、讚美、相聚、良好的溝通模式、精神上的福祉,及應付危機與壓力的能力。健康的家庭並不是沒有壓力或問題,但是他們能面對困難、在危機中學習處理並與家人一齊成長。因此健康的家庭被稱為「壓力管理有效家庭」。人際互動過程中,彼此的差異是難免的。如能做適當處理,往往能促成家庭中份子或家庭系統的良性轉變,而帶來正面的後果,甚至還可能增加家庭份子的凝聚力及關係的成長。但是如果不去面對或處理不當,衝突及彼此的差異則可能帶給家庭人際關係冷漠、失望,甚至引起家中成員彼此間的傷害。我們對事實的想法、期待與情緒是相互影響的。情緒或反應行為是深受自己對事與人的解釋的影響。我們往往以自己獨特的習慣來瞭解事實並且做解釋。連續思考的結果造成了情緒的起伏。我們對事情的解釋習慣和人應該如何的期待深受我們原生家庭的影響。從小經過自己我們的教導及親身經驗,我們對事情應該如何有固定的想法。這些想法有些是對人與人關係有幫助的,但是有些卻造成我們其實並不喜歡可是又無法控制的自然反應破壞了我們最重視的人際關係。

當我們可以有效及合理的處理情緒的問題時,就不至於因為情緒的影響而使關係陷入反覆的挫折中。讓我們一起來認識我們的情緒並且學習如何減低情緒對我們的影響。

工作坊的內容會讓你突然領悟到原來人際關係的挫折是有原因的。針對這些原因可以學習到新的作法及轉念的方法。常有學員有豁然開朗的效果。

本工作坊藉由傾聽、協助整理思緒,瞭解自己對事實的解讀習慣及假定,至終能夠增加想法的彈性及對人性的瞭解。並且學習使人感到溫暖的說話方式。給自己一個機會改變人生的色彩,「轉個念頭陽光依舊燦爛」。

 

課程的特色

幽默、活潑。有示範;小組練習及觀摩.

 

讲员背景

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武自珍

國際理情行為治療師/台灣合格諮商心理師/中國合格高級心理諮詢師

  • 理性情緒行為治療諮商方法REBT國際唯一訓練中心,艾理斯理情學院(Albert Ellis Institute)的Associate Fellow.
  • REBT 理性情緒行為治療法創始人亞伯、艾理斯Albert Ellis直接授業弟子
  • 獲艾理斯理情學院頒發之理性情緒行為心理治療法治療師證書
  • 獲艾理斯理情學院頒發之理性情緒行為治療法國際督導師證書
  • 目前為第一屆華人心理諮詢師協會理事
  • 台灣各社會福利機構顧問、訓練講師及個案督導師

 

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曾任

  • 東海大學學生事務長
  • 東海大學社會工作系系主任
  • 東海大學學生諮商中心主任
  • 東海大學幸福家庭研究推廣中心主任
  • 台中市生命線主任(自殺防制熱線)
  • 研究與訓練重心
  • 情緒研究與情緒管理
  • 認知情緒行為心理學
  • 人類行為與社會環境
  • 親子關係
  • 婚姻關係問題處理與重整
  • 中國人的理與情 

 

合理情緒行为治疗法 (簡称为REBT)

「合理情緒行為治療法」(簡稱為REBT)是由艾裏斯(ALBERT ELLIS) 所創立的治療方法。REBT的創始人艾裏斯認為人都有其獨特的思想傾向,或扭曲或合理,都十分固執固定。人的行為及情緒無不受自己認知習慣的影響。我們會持續固定保持一些不利自己的想法或無效的問題解決方法及行為反應造成困境。因此我們若要改變行為及情緒必須要先認識自己對事實解釋的傾向去除自我設限的認知習慣。因此合理情緒行為治療重點在於引導案主注意自己已成習慣的思考習慣及信念、提出邏輯實驗性的思考型態與案主討論,並配合注重教育功能之家庭作業,來對當事人思考傾向提出挑戰、並且協助案主做認知解釋的合理轉換進而改變其習慣性行為反應恢復面對人生難題及解決問題的能力的治療諮商方法。

REBT諮商員用幽默、誠懇、直接、務實及瞭解人性的限制的態度上協助當事人檢視自己的不合理的信念,減少自我挫敗的看法。因而恢復當事人實際面對生活能力,而協助案主經營彈性的實際目標及健康的生活態度。當事人經過諮商治療後能想的更合情合理、感覺更合適、行動更有機會達成個人所追求的幸福目標。

 

理性情緒行為治療法的創始人:亞伯艾理斯 Albert Ellis

理性情緒行為治療法REBT 是臨床心理學家艾裏斯於1955年所建立的心理治療學派.亞伯、艾裏斯與卡爾、羅吉斯、佛洛依德、艾克理森及其他的學派創始人齊名被譽為最具影響力的心理治療大師。

艾里斯本身曾於一九九三年獲選為美國心理協會頒贈之心理治療傑出貢獻獎、一九九二年獲頒年度人本主義人物獎給。

艾裏斯曾擔任美國心理協會顧問會主席、美國性科學研究學會理事長、美國心理治療學院副總裁、亞伯艾裏斯學院創始人及總裁。

 

亞伯艾理斯Albert Ellis與武自珍教授

武自珍教授是台灣及中國合格的諮商心理師暨高級心理諮詢師是直接接受REBT創始人亞伯艾理斯Albert Ellis訓練及督導的徒弟。先後獲得REBT心理治療師及REBT國際督導師證書。為亞洲僅有少數的REBT 合格督導師也是世界極少數會說華語的訓練講師。亞伯艾理斯曾於一九九七年接受武自珍教授的邀請到台灣做十天的演講與工作坊,由武自珍教授擔任協同講師。

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报名和缴交方式

 

  1. 请将报名表格寄/交予给 Breakthru Enrichment Station,或扫描,电邮至bestcenter@breakthru.com.my
  2. 课程费请存入Maybank Account No: 5-14066-13927-6 或支票付款于”Breakthru Enrichment Station Sdn Bhd
  3. 缴费后请电邮您的银行收据于bestcenter@breakthru.com.my
  4. 如有任何疑问,将以email询问您。
  5. 如您需要收据,本中心将在当天给予。

 

上课地点

Breakthru Enrichment Station
70-2, 2nd Floor, Block H, Platinum Walk,
Taman Danau Kota, 53300 Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia

 

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报名费(每人):RM250

(4 月 10 日 2014 前报名省RM50)

特别优惠

夫妻 (双人):RM400

学生 (每五人组):RM600

 

网上报名请点击这里。

询问详情,请联络:

03- 2858 7977

Parental Coaching Programs 2013

There were a few things happening during the holidays. Most of our teachers and facilitators underwent a series of training with renowned trainer, Cecilia Koester, USA, Author of ‘I am the child’ and ‘Movement Based Learning for children with all abilities’ and Founder of Movement Based Learning Inc. www.movementbasedlearning.com. We had up close and personal learning sessions with her witnessing the parental coaching process to identify the children’s specific needs in their learning dimensions.

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We hope to share this precious learning experience with you, spouse and care giver of your child so that we may partner together to see a smoother breakthru and progress for your child’s current challenges in 2013.

During the last year talent time in November, we announced that we will be conducting a series of parental coaching programme. The dates are now set as follows:

19 Jan 2013 (Sat) * 10am-12noon (Program 1 & 2)

Or 24 Jan 2013 (Thur) 10am-12noon
Or 25 Jan 2013 (Fri) 1.30pm-3pm

Topic : Messy is Necessary
Movement Based Learning Building Blocks Activities 1 & 2

3 March 2013 (Sun) * 3pm-6pm (Special CNY Program)

Topic : Functioning Pattern – Grow the forest by planting a tree
Chinese New Year Gathering (Please bring a dish)

27 April 2013 (Sat) * 10am-12noon (Program 3)
Or 3 May 2013 (Fri) * 2pm-4pm

Topic : Culture of Accountability
Movement Based Learning Building Blocks Activities 3

19 May 2013 (Sun) * 3pm-5pm (Program 4)
Or 24 May 2013 (Fri) * 2pm-4pm

Topic : Gift of love and acceptance vs. punishment or rewards
Movement Based Learning Building Blocks Activities 4

13 July 2013 (Sat) * 10am-12noon (Program 5)
Or 19 July 2013 (Fri) * 2pm-4pm

Topic : Keys to unlock the blocks – appropriate approach at appropriate time
Movement Based Learning Building Blocks Activities 5

25 Aug 2013 (Sun) * 3pm-5pm (Program 6)
Or 30 Aug 2013 (Fri) * 2pm-4pm

Topic : Solutions – back up to the foundation before building the pillars.
Movement Based Learning Building Blocks Activities 6

21 Sept 2013 (Sat) * 10am-12noon (Program 7)
Or 27 Sept 2013 (Fri) * 2pm-4pm

Topic : Develop the strength of noticing and inner leadership
Movement Based Learning Building Blocks Activities 7

Parents Coaching Programme is specially arranged to support parents who have children with learning challenges / disabilities. The coaching programme includes 7 essential topics and 7 movement based learning building blocks activities that addresses the foundational pieces of learning so that children who have special needs can learn how to learn. Parents are coached to support their children in a functional, practical way so that any information is directly applicable and useable.

What is Movement Based Learning

The movements and activities that Movement Based Learning, Inc. incorporate in the child’s learning are based on natural, normal human development. They bring about rapid and often dramatic improvements in focus, comprehension, communication, organization and physical movement. The Brain Gym® International Foundation developed a unique program of physical activities that synchronizes body and mind to enhance learning and achievement for people of all ages and abilities. The activities and methods of Brain Gym® are safe, easy and enjoyable. Cecilia Koester developed a course for Brain Gym® International called Brain Gym® for Special Needs Providers. Therapists, teachers, tutors, elder caregivers and parents as well as anyone in the caring professions will benefit from learning how to assess the needs of an individual, develop a Brain Gym® program to meet those needs, evaluate the effectiveness of the program with ways to modify when necessary for best results.

Brain Gym® for Special Needs Providers offers excellent applications for a variety of mental and physical challenges including: autism, cerebral palsy, attention deficit disorders (ADD and ADHD), dyslexia, Angelman’s Syndrome, Down Syndrome, speech impairments, brain injuries, blindness, deafness and impairments caused by strokes.

Participants will leave this course with the new skills that optimize learning and performance in all areas of life. And they will find that these tools are immediately applicable in home, school and therapeutic settings!
In addition to teaching the above courses, Cecilia Koester is mentoring others to teach Brain Gym® for Special Education Providers.

To gain more knowledge about MBL follow this link.

(source taken from Movement Based Learning website at www.movementbasedlearning.com)

Fees : RM800

Please contact us at 03-28587977 (Ms Elaine Lim) to register now.

Cecilia Koester and Brain Gym for Special Needs Provider (Nov 2012)

Cecilia Koester, M.Ed, the founder of Movement Based Learning, is internationally known for her work with children and adults who have special needs. She has worked since 1979 with people of all abilities ‐ from typically functioning to those diagnosed with severe disabilities.

In 1998, she published the provocative book, “I Am the Child: Using Brain Gym® with Children Who Have Special Needs”, which chronicles her experiences as a teacher in a public school classroom, drawing out the gifts of eleven children with complex developmental needs. Brain Gym® 170 has been developed by Cece for the Educational Kinesiology Foundation, and she is currently the only instructor registered to teach this specialized course. She has studied at length with the founders of Brain Gym®, Dr. Paul and Gail Dennison, to deepen her understanding of these simple and effective tools for optimal living.

Visit her website at: www.movementbasedlearning.com

Cecilia is coming to Malaysia to conduct a Brain Gym for Special Needs Provider (BG170) workshop from 29 November – 2 December 2012, organized by Breakthru Enrichment Station. For registration or further info, please contact Ms Phoebe (+6012-3292681) or register online:

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You may also download a copy of our flyer, and send in the attached form for registration. Please contact us if you have any enquiries at the phone number written above, or call 03-28587977.

>> DOWNLOAD FLYER (.pdf) <<

 

What is Brain Gym® For Special Needs Providers (and everyone who cares for people) ?

Developmental experts have known for more than 80 years that
physical movement activates the brain and enhances learning.

This 32-hour experiential course (BG170) provides an in‐depth study of how to use Brain Gym® with children and adults, with specific adaptations for those with special needs.

Therapists, teachers, tutors, and parents as well as others in the caring professions will benefit from learning how to

  • assess the needs of an individual,
  • develop a Brain Gym® program to meet those needs,
  • evaluate the effectiveness of the program with ways to
  • modify when necessary for best results.

“Brain Gym® for Special Needs Providers” provides excellent applications for a variety of mental and physical challenges including: autism, cerebral palsy, attention deficit disorders (ADD and ADHD), dyslexia, Angelman’s Syndrome, Down Syndrome, speech impairment, brain injuries, blindness, deafness and impairments caused by strokes.

In this course, students learn:

  • 26 Brain Gym® movements and modifications for special cases
  • 7 Building Block activities which support integration of the nervous system
  • The 5‐Step balance process which targets goals for learning and performance
  • Dennison Laterality Re-patterning for whole brain/body integration
  • The principles behind Edu‐K

*Brain Gym® is a registered trademark of the Education Kinesiology Foundation,USA and Brain Gym® International. http://www.braingym.org

Testimonies from previous participants

Sue Walker  – Therapist

I think that this course should be considered as a pre-requisite for all potential Brain Gym Instructors, possibly replacing Brain Gym review.  I will recommend it to anyone interested in finding out more about practical applications of Brain Gym.

I love how your calmness creates changes in us all.

Isabella Thackeray

I feel I have developed the skills to become a better therapist for children with special needs.

Keep teaching! Your classes are very inspirational and provide us with the skills to change the lives of special children.

Lian Ai – Educationist

She’s really innovative in applying brain gym movements.

May Chuah – RMT Instructor

I am grounded with the theory and able to relate the movements to the theory. Positive and I am looking forward to work with the children with my heart.

I like the way Cece teach. She allows my presence in her presence. Cece demo and explained every details why she do this and do that. I have learned to be a better teacher from Cece. Thank you Cece.

Eugenie Chan – Occupational Therapist

‘Go for it! It will open up a new bag of helping tools for you!’

Great Instructor. Never a dull moment. The ‘simplicity’ in conveying the message to the participants.

Didi – Yoga and Meditation Instructor

Cece is sharing to us instead of teaching us. So I personally felt great to know her and hope to learn more from her love and compassion. We know she is great teacher.

I would like to come back to BG170 again.

Hasanah Hassan – Educator, Mother

That every parents, teachers and therapists should have this knowledge as the basis of their work.

I have only the best comments for Cece. She is a great teacher and have a lot of patience and presence for us.

Poong Kody – News Editor

That this course benefits everyone, children to adults, with or without special needs.

Definitely an advanced course on this subject is called for.

Excellent training module with sufficient materials, activities and explanation. Well done.

Sen Ling – Chartered Secretary

Yes, I am more equipped and know how to help my son and other who need my help.

I have truly understand what Cecilia has taught because she truly understand us and how to deliver this course in the manner simple and interesting
.

Julia – Teacher

I have hope. I am more happy. I have lost some of my stress. I am walking UPRIGHT.

This course is worth my time. A very good course. You will have hope after attending this course.

Thank you very much. You are a good teacher. I have learned a lot.

Wan Po Yan – Housewife

Cece is an excellent instructor and have the heart for everyone in needs.

Yee Yen Ling

I am so happy that I’ve learned so much and I can’t wait to apply the techniques on my children. I will tell everyone that they should go ahead and learn ‘Brain Gym’

I’ve learned so much from you Cece! You’re so kind and patience, and have the heart for special needs children.

Donna Kam – Kinesiologist

The breaking down of movements into simple pieces which are so good to do with disable clients.

Cece is very patient, very clear in explaining everything. Thanks a lot for your kindness.

Angelie Tee – Assistant Administrator

I am so excited to go back now and apply to my son.

I really wish you can come to Sabah (Borneo) so that many in our place can benefit from ‘Brain Gym’

Beside with a simple and clear explanation, you are so experienced and caring especially seeing you working on a special need child.

Register for the above course now:

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Special Small Group SessionsCecelia Koester will also be having special small-group learning for parent and child on the subsequent days. Such small-group allows parents to:

  • Have Intimate 1-1 attention with each parent attending with one child.
  • Learn, through experience, basic developmental movements that stimulate brain function.
  • See dramatic improvements in concentration, organization, reading, writing, physical coordination and speech.
  • Find what to do with a child who…Come frustrated…….leave renewed and inspired!

Choice of date and time for small-group:-

a) 5th December morning (1pm-5pm)  or
b) 6th December afternoon (9am-1pm)

One session – one child with his/her parents or care giver, limited to 8 families per session.

Interested families please register at link below:
http://breakthru.com.my/best/registration/?ee=49

 

Teachers Training“Working with Children Who Have Special Needs: A Movement-based Learning Approach”

For candidates that wish to teach a one-day workshop that uses the developmental Building Block Activities found in the “Brain Gym for Special Needs Provider” class, Cecilia is prepared to conduct a 1 day Teacher-Training on Movement Based Learning workshop after the completion of the above mentioned class on 4 December 2012 * 9am-4pm * Kuala Lumpur.

This workshop will provide:

  • An experiential 6-hour workshop with Cecilia teaching
  • Feedback from 4 case studies
  • 2 hours of phone consultation time with regard to private clients or questions about the workshops you present regarding movement-based learning
  • A ready-to-use PowerPoint file.

To find out more about this workshop and register yourself, please check the link here: http://breakthru.com.my/best/registration/?ee=51

You may download a copy of the flyer for this event for further information and registration here. Please contact us at 03-28587977 (Ms Elaine Lim) or 012-3292681 (Ms Phoebe Long) for enquiries

>> DOWNLOAD FLYER FOR TEACHERS TRAINING <<

Visioncirc​les – Exploring the Developmen​tal Play Stages

Do you want to add movements in your Brain Gym tool box? Ever wonder why children need play? Ever wonder why play is so important in the developmental stages of a child? Come and find out more at the upcoming Visioncircles training which will provide the knowledge on the developmental stages through play in a child life and how it affects our living as adults when we missed out some of the stages in our younger age.

 

The Visioncircles provides a road map to the completion of developmental skills through movement, play and art.

It is an exploration of eight areas of perceptual intelligence. We experience each of these areas as a circle or “life space”, its specific boundaries imposed by the activities it involves. Although the eight Vision Circles develop simultaneously, each circle activates distinct brain circuitry and has a unique character and vocabulary by which it can be identified. Each session of the course may be reminiscent of our play and our exploration of the world as children, as each is naturally emphasized during a specific stage of our early growth and development.

About Glenys Leadbeater

imageOne of the founders of Edu-K in New Zealand, Glenys is on the NZ Edu-K Network Board, became Faculty in 1992 and was the Chairperson of the International Faculty for the Educational Kinesiology Foundation from 1999-2003. In 2001 she was recognized by Brain Gym International with the Outstanding Achievement Award for her contributions to the field of Educational Kinesiology. She also serves on the Educational Kinesiology Practitioners Accreditation Board in NZ. She has worked tirelessly in teaching and promoting Edu-K in all areas of life throughout New Zealand, Asia, Japan, USA and UK. She is currently mentor for Hong Kong /China, Singapore and Canada, and Asian Liaison Faculty.

Course Contents

Through Visioncircles, you will:

  • Explore the relationship between vision, brain integration and learning.
  • Experience the developmental aspects of each circle through hands-on activities.
  • Enhance sensory awareness.
  • Develop a greater ease in movement and improvement in fine motor skills with a better sense of space and direction.
  • Expand skills of self-expression and creativity.
  • Improve skills of active vision, visual focus and creative imagination.
  • Increase auditory skills to improve memory, listening and voice resonance.
  • Add 32 Vision Gym Activities to your Brain Gym toolkit.

Vision Circles is a trip you will wish you could take again and again. And guess what? You can! You will have the tools to revisit the places and share with others the delight in brighter awareness of all that is around you.

Who will benefit?

Parents, therapists, teachers and adults who have learning challenges who would like to have more understanding and experience what’s going on “inside” and how to “reorganize” the brain through Brain Gym® balance process.

Please note the training hours are as below:

This is a 3-day course:
Day 1 (6 June 2012) 9:30 am – 9:00 pm
Day 2 (7 June 2012) 10:00 am – 9:00 pm
Day 3 (8 June 2012) 10:00 am – 5:00pm

>> Vision Circles provides 24 hours of Elective requirements for Brain Gym licensure.

Private consultation session with Glenys is available on 5 June and 10 June 2012 @ RM300 per 1 hour session. Limited space only.

Please call +603-2858 7977 (Elaine) or +6012-3292681 (Phoebe) for further enquiries and registration, or
click here to register online: http://breakthru.com.my/best/registration/?ee=40

Stimulating Brain Growth – News Article

New Sunday Times, 8 Apr 2011 – An interview with Phoebe Long by NST reporter Chandra Devi Renganayar.

MOVEMENT: There are many programmes available now which addresses learning and behavioural challenges in children through natural body movements.

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Phoebe Long (left) and Paul Dennison, founder of Brain Gym(R)

 

The early reflexes or muscle movements of an infant are critical for the development of his or her brain functions, and ability to learn.

Under normal conditions, all reflexes will appear during the appropriate stage of a child’s development.

According to experts, when these reflexes are not initiated, integrated or inhibited in a child, they will prevent the natural maturity of the neural systems, leading to postural and behavioural problems, and learning difficulties in children.

Phoebe Long, an Educational Kinesiologist and consultant specialising in helping children with special needs, says the early childhood experiences of movement and play activate the brain and develop its neural networks.

She says that many children who do not have sufficient and adequate sensory experiences and physical movements during their childhood may experience learning gaps.

Many factors, Long says, can disrupt the normal progression of natural infant reflexes and developmental movements.

“For example, a baby delivered through a normal birth undergoes primary motor reflex patterns but when the child is delivered via Caesarean section, he or she does not engage these reflexes. “When a baby crawls, he or she develops connections between the right and left hemispheres of the brain, strengthening their corpus collosum. These movements develop the neural networks in the brain, which are essential to learning. Placing the child in a walker will hinder his or her natural progress”

She says allowing children to watch television for long hours or spend time on computers instead of interactive play with family members and friends may cause delay in speech and other developmental issues.

“The more we hinder a child’s natural developmental movements, the more we create a learning gap in the brain. The more a child moves, the better connected his or her brain is,” says Long who has been involved in teaching special needs children for more than five years.

In order for children to respond well to learning experiences, she says, the issue of retained reflexes should be addressed.

An approach that has gained recognition to deal with this problem, says Long, is movement-based learning.

According to her, movement-based learning approaches like Brain Gym, Rhythmic Movement Training and Sensory Integration have been widely used to support not only children with learning disabilities but also all children to discover their true potential.

Brain Gym, for instance, is based on the philosophy that the brain will develop via certain body movements. It emerged as a result of clinical studies since the 1970s by Dr Paul E. Dennison, an educational therapist who was looking for ways to help children and adults with learning difficulties.

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(The Lazy 8s movement uses a drawing of a figure eight to increase integration between the two side of the brain.)

Brain Gym addresses three specific learning dimensions called Focus, Centering and Laterality, all of which serve as neural ‘bridges’ of the brain.

The Focusing dimension deals with the coordination of the front and rear brain, and is connected to the ability to focus and comprehend.

The Centering dimension is linked to the coordination of the upper and lower brain and is related to emotions, relaxation and organisation.

The Laterality dimension, on the other hand, deals with the coordination of the left and right hemispheres of the brain and is useful for activities such as reading, writing and communicating.

“These movements facilitate the connection between the key areas of the brain. It engages the whole brain. When the three dimensions work together, the whole system is balanced, allowing a person to comprehend, communicate and organise better,” says Long.

She says there are 26 basic Brain Gym movements. “All the movements and activities are introduced based on observing the postural and behavioural patterns in a child.

“The Lengthening activities, for example, may be done to help children with ADHD and autistic spectrum disorders who often have problems sitting still and staying focused. One of the exercises used is the ‘calf pump’ which involves stretching the child’s right leg backwards while the heel is held for about eight seconds. It is then slowly released.

“The movement is repeated with the left leg for about a minute to lengthen the tendon in the calf. This is done to discharge the fear reflex,” says Long.

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Other preparatory exercises which may stimulate the brain and relax the body include the “Cross Crawl”, “Lazy 8s” and “Double Doodle”

The “Cross Crawl” involves taking the left arm of a child and crossing over to the right knee as it is raised. The same is done with the child’s right arm.

It is done to access both brain hemispheres and improve left-right coordination, vision and hearing.

The “Lazy 8s” movement uses the drawing of a figure eight to increase integration between the two sides of the brain, and the “Double Doodle” requires children to draw using both hands at the same time to improve visual perception and creative expression.

She stresses that for proper neurological development to take place, these activities must not be forced but incorporated smoothly throughout the day.

“The improvements in learning and behaviour among children are progressive and sure. However, it is not a panacea to solve children’s learning difficulties or cure neurobiological disorders,” says Long.

Read more: Connecting the brain – General – New Straits Times http://www.nst.com.my/nation/general/connecting-the-brain-1.71852#ixzz1rQTZiIvC

Steve Jobs painting, with both hands simultaneously!

Came across this superb portrait painting of Steve Job by Aaron Kizer, who uses many techniques of drawing using both hands. How many of us can paint with both hands at the same time?

 

We are excited to find out that many of his techniques are taught in Double Doodle class. Double Doodle is an activity that we use to enhance visual perception and artistic expression with our children, and it trains their visual skills, hand-eye coordination and creativity.

We have brought in Ms Glenys Leadbeater from New Zealand to teach us on Double Doodle Play, and her class will start on 4 December 2011! In this workshop you will learn how the following abilities affect reading and fine-motor skills of a child:

  • Crossing the visual/kinesthetic midline
  • Binocularity for working in the midfield
  • The internalization of early development movement
  • Spatial awareness and depth perception
  • Self- perception as it regards movement and tactility

Find out more about this workshop here:
http://breakthru.com.my/best/2011/06/double-doodle-play-a-window-to-whole-brain-vision-4/

Registration has begun, please proceed to register now if you don’t want to miss this chance!

Rhythmic Movement Training Level 1 & 2 (ADD/ADHD/Autism)

Remanlay RMT

what is RMT?
Rhythmic Movement Training (RMT) is dedicated to bringing tremendous benefits to children and adults with challenges including:

  • ADD/ADHD
  • dyslexia
  • dyspraxia
  • coordination difficulties
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • Parkinson’s disease and stroke

RMT looks at the role of developmental movements that babies naturally make

  • Before birth
  • The first six months after birth
  • As they get up on their hands and knees
  • As they learn to walk

RMT looks at how these movements are crucial in laying down the foundations for neural network pathway growth and myelinisation in the brain, and its effect on learning as we grow and develop, and come to rely on the lifelong postural reflexes.  It works with integrating the retained, or underdeveloped, infant reflexes that are involved in learning challenges such as ADD/ADHD, dyslexia, dyspraxia, writing problems, focussing and comprehension challenges, co-ordination difficulties and Asperger’s Syndrome.

RMT has also been successful in working with people with anxiety, panic, emotional imbalances, behavioural problems, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s, psychosis and general overwhelm.

this training is best for
If you work in these fields :
Education • social work • physiotherapy • occupational therapy• psychology and psychiatry chiropractic • kinesiology • care giving for children, the elderly or adults with special needs. OR
are a family member of someone with special needs, are interested in self-growth.

dates
RMT 1: 15 & 16 Oct 2011
RMT 2: 17 Oct 2011

course organizer and location
Breakthru Enrichment Station
70-2, 2nd Flr, Blk H, Platinum Walk
Taman Danau Kota, Setapak
53200 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Map: http://breakthru.com.my/map

course content
RMT Level 1 (RMT and ADD/ADHD)
16 Hours

In this 2-day course participants learn the basics of the Rhythmic Movement Training: how rhythmic movements can be used to assist in regulating muscle tone; stimulating the connections between the cerebellum and the neocortex, especially the frontal lobes in order to improve attention and control impulses. The course also includes examining the role of the primitive reflexes in development, and how to integrate them using rhythmic movements and isometric pressure.

Participants in this class have been teachers, occupational therapists, physiotherapists/physical therapists, behavioural optomotrists, vision trainers, kinesiologists, Brain Gym instructors, doctors, nurses, early childhood specialists etc. Course content includes:

What is RMT?
The Triune Brain and Development
Nerve Chassis, Cerebellum,
Reptile Brain/Basal Ganglia
Development and Primitive Reflexes
RMT and Primitive Reflexes
TLR, Landau, STNR, Spinal Galant, Amphibian, Babinski
Active and Passive Movements for Integration
Identifying Developmental Imbalances

RMT Level 2 (RMT & The Limbic System)

This 1-day course addresses how the rhythmic movement training affects our emotions, how to work with movements to get in touch with our emotions and to stabilise them when they threaten to take control. It also examines how stress and daily life affects our body and how the rhythmic movements can help to relax and ease muscle tension. It is a necessary supplement for anyone who wishes to work with rhythmic movement training. The course also deals with rhythmic movement training in autism and psychosis. Course content includes:

Emotional Development and RMT
Moro Reflex and Emotions
Motor Function and the Limbic System
Movements for Emotional Development
Muscle Tension and Repressed Feelings
Movements to Relax Muscle Tension and Release Feelings
Movement for the Limbic System
Movements for the Spine
The Importance of Play
Emotional Reactions to RMT
Frontal Lobes the Limbic System and RMT
Autism and RMT

Pre-requisite: RMT Levels 1

speaker’s profile
RemanlayHenry Remanlay, has been learning and using RMT for special needs children since 2003, and a Brain Gym and TFH Instructor since 2002. with his wife, Dr Tan Shot Yen, establish “ Dr TAN WELLBEING CLINICS & REMANLAY SPECIAL NEEDS’ HEALTH ” in 2008, Henry gives many consultations in some special needs schools in Jakarta.

 

 

 

please register online here

registeronline